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Mario's 1940 Ford Deluxe Danbury Mint 1/24 Scale Model

1940 Ford Deluxe Coupe

1 My 1940 Ford Deluxe Danbury Mint 1/24 scale diecast model.

2 An upscale alternative to bridge the gap between its base model called Standard and the luxury Lincoln.

3 The 1940 De Luxe Ford Coupe featured a three-part chrome and painted grille with horizontal bars.

4 Extensive chrome treatment and new sealed beam Teardrop Headlights with the Flathead V8.

5 Split rear window, beautiful sloped back and those famous Sargent Stripe taillights.

6 Trunk opens to show roominess and full-size whitewall spare tire.

7 Hood opens to show famous Ford detailed 221CID 1-bbl 85 hp Flathead V8.

8 Doors open to show detailed interior with operable steering wheel.

9 Open door to show detailed wooden instrument panel.

10 Chrome bumpers, much chrome trim on the Ford Deluxe.

11 Rear side view.

12 Rear side view with open doors, hood and trunk.

13 Side view. Doors, hood and trunk open.

14 Side view door open.

15 Front side view, look at those wide whitewalls.

16 Rear side view.

17 Top view.

18 Undercarriage view showing much detail.

19 My entire collection of 124 scale diecast models by Franklin Mint and Danbury Mint.

20 Over 50 of my favorite all time classic cars in my collection.


Video and audio clips

1940 Ford Cars promotional film.


1940 Ford Color Commercial



Related

More Cars of the 1940s
More Ford Coverage

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Comments

Mario on Oct 28, 2022 said:

One of the many diecast models in my collection. The 1940 Ford Deluxe Coupe is a classic car that is very popular and one of the last of the great prewar cars made by Ford.

Enjoy, Mario!

[Reply to this comment]

57timemachine on Oct 29, 2022 said:

If you squint your eyes just a bit, it looks real. The quality of some of these die casts are amazing. The 1940 Ford will forever be most peoples favorite Ford from the 1940's. It sure is my favorite that Ford had to offer for that decade. They just nailed it in every way that year. Beautiful design.

[Reply to this comment]

Mario on Oct 29, 2022 said:

Yes George the diecast models today are incredibly detailed and as you say look very real. The 1940 Ford is an Icon and one of my favorite Fords as well. I'm mostly a Chevy and GM guy, I love Pontiacs but there are some Fords I like also. And the 40 Ford is one of them. All the diecast models I have were patiently thought out and I am very proud of them. Thank you for your comments. Cheers!

[Reply to this comment]

azmusclecar on Oct 30, 2022 said:

Were you ever a kid, okay that was dumb.

Start over. Do you remember when you were a kid, I would buy and build models and there were those days when I wish I could shrink myself down and get into those model cars AND planes.

When that movie: HONEY I SHRUNK THE KIDS came out, I went to see what the secret was to shrinking.

Another time in life I was lied to. ;-(

These models are so detailed, with gauges and engines, like George said, if you squint you can darn near think they are real.

Better keep the keys to those cars out of the hands of kids Mario. You never know when a shrunken one is going to take your model for a ride.

[Reply to this comment]

Mario on Oct 31, 2022 said:

Yes as a kid I did try shrinking myself down in my head anyway to the scale of the model cars I was building. It was fun pretending to drive them around on the floor. That movie was hilarious and I'll have to watch out for any shrunken kids trying to steal my diecast cars! I'll have to post some shrunken guard dogs in my cabinet!

[Reply to this comment]

azmusclecar on Oct 30, 2022 said:

I like how those tail lights were called Sergeant Tail Lights as they resemble the military Sergeant Stripes. Cool beans!!!!

[Reply to this comment]

Mario on Oct 31, 2022 said:

I was always intrigued by those sargent stripe taillights which is why my goal years later was to be a sargent in the service. Happily I did. Cheers!

[Reply to this comment]


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