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Mario's Tribute to Car Carriers In Color

1954 Fords on car carrier

Before the Car Carrier Industry started, new cars were shipped from the factory by Train, Ship or driven separately by paid drivers to a freight yard for pick up by the dealer.

The dealers had to manage all of the logistics of finding their cars in the freight yards, unloading them, and moving them back to their dealership.

Companies sprung up to handle these services for the dealers and the Car Carrier Industry was born. Many became the main early car transport companies.

After WW11 in the mid Forties new car sales were booming and many new car carrier companies were formed. A high demand for car carriers existed to deliver the new cars to the dealer.

Car hauling went through some very evolutionary steps and took some time for it to establish its modern current role.

This is my Tribute to the Car Transport Carrier Industry. Enjoy, Mario.

1 1910 Ford Model Ts loaded on rail cars. 90 percent of the completed Model Ts were shipped within 24 hours, because no storage was available at the factory.

2 1920s Angled Dodges. Back then manufacturers sold their cars FOB, meaning that any shipping and delivery expense was on the dealer.

3 1920s Car Carrier. These long rigs were cheap and loading and unloading was a breeze.

4 1920s Chevys. The dealers had to manage all of the logistics of finding their cars in the freight yards, unloading them, and moving them back to their dealership.

5 Companies sprung up to handle these services for the dealers. W & K Carriers was one of the leading early builders of car carrier equipment.

6 1920s Ford. Many Ford dealers chose to take delivery of their Ts in unassembled form, as seen here of some dozen chassis in one end of a box car.

7 1920s Model A. How the carriers of the ’20s looked, no regulations on trucking in order to minimize capital expense. Long rigid trailers, with four cars on board.

8 1922 Truck hauling unassembled Model Ts which dealer will assemble. This explains hauling unassembled cars, as it was cheaper than hauling completed cars.

9 1925 Ford Model T in a Van. Companies sprung up to handle these services for the dealers. Many eventually became the main early car transport companies.

10 1929 Cars on GMC Six car carrier. There were some two-level rigs, like this one hauling six cars.

11 1930s cars. Illinois and Kentucky had the most restrictive length regulations, at 35′ overall maximum in Illinois. This resulted in the “Illinois Specials”, that could still haul four cars.

12 1930s. In less restrictive states, four car rigs became the standard. Cars were loaded tilted, to allow the same number of cars on shorter trailers.

13 1930s cars. Kentucky’s maximum was 30′. Loads coming from out of state had to be unloaded and hauled on one of these “Kentucky Specials”, which had a three-car capacity.

14 1930s Chevys. The unregulated era came to a crashing halt in 1932, when the ICC was given the power to regulate all interstate trucking.

15 1930s Four-car-carrier. They were dangerous for several reasons, one of them being the huge overhang at the rear which meant the trailer swung out widely in corners and curves.

16 1930s Fords. By 1935, all trucking companies had to file as private, common or contract carriers. In addition States were imposing their own regulations.

17 1940 Ford Woody being transported.

18 1940 Pontiacs on a GMC transporter in Oklahoma.

19 1940s cars on a sleek new car carrier.

20 1940s cars. This drawing from the ’40s shows the way complete cars were shipped in box cars, with special lifts. There were also turntables to facilitate getting the cars in.

21 1946 Fords being lowered for delivery. It was a special moment at the dealership when the carrier pulled up to deliver a fresh load of shiny new cars.

22 1946 Fords on modern carrier. After the War new car sales were booming and many new car carrier companies were formed.

23 1948 Ford pickup trucks on car carrier. A high demand for car carriers existed post war.

24 1948 A rare photo of Tuckers being delivered.

25 1949 Chevrolet is loaded. We get a glimpse of the trailer interior. Note the riveted, semi-unit construction.

26 1949 Fords on an Auto Carrier Barge. All means of shipping were tried out due to the explosion of new car sales.

27 1949 Fords on a semi enclosed car carrier.

28 1950 Fords leaving the factory. Top row cars were covered to protect them from the elements.

29 1950s Buicks arriving at their Dealer.

30 1950s Studebakers on car carrier.

31 1954 Fords. Tilting allowed more cars on a carrier.

32 1955 Buicks on car carrier.

33 1955 Ford T-Birds on Convoy Company sleeper carrier.

34 1955 Chevys being transported.

35 1955 Ford station wagons. The top forward car unloads forward with ramps.

36 1955 Ford cars and trucks on transporter.

37 1955 Pontiacs getting unloaded.

38 1956 Chevys. Tilting allowed for shorter trailers.

39 1956 Chevys and car carrier at Junk Yard.

39a 1956 Rusty Chevys

40 1956 Chevys rusting on their car carrier

40a 1956 Chevys rear view at Junk Yard.

41 1956 Fords being unloaded.

42 1957 Chevys being unloaded from a rail carrier.

43 1957 Chrysler Corp cars.

44 1957 Fords. Note 3 wagons and 3 sedans. Wagons were in high demand in the 50's.

45 1958 Mercurys. Several truck loads. Unique marketing gimmick.

46 1959 Chevys transported on a 1957 Ford Big Job F800.

47 1959 Plymouths, Dodges, Imperials and Chryslers on an Auto Rail Carrier.

48 1959 Plymouths on rail carrier.

49 1960 Chevy Corvairs waiting to be transported.

50 1960 Chevys on car carrier. The marketing point of the car haulers was “You’ll be the first driver”.

51 1960 Fords headed to the dealer.

52 1960 Ford Falcons on an 8-car carrier.

53 1961 Fords on a 7-car carrier.

54 1962 Chevrolet cabover tractor in Oshawa Ontario.

55 1962 Chevrolets on a 7-car carrier. Car hauling went through some very evolutionary steps and took some time for it to establish its current role.

56 1965 Chevy Trucks on a Long Rail Carrier. In the early days most cars were either shipped by rail or driven to their destination.

56a 1966 Chevys

56b 1967 Chevys

56c 1967 Chevys

56d 1967 Camaros

57 Convoy Company Peak Car Carrier. Dodge L-series tractor. Triple decker with 13 cars.

58 The same company, Convoy, based in Portland, OR regularly operated this rig that carried 18 Hondas under a special permit.

59 China, where they carry cars two wide on top. Looks to be 21 VWs on there.

60 A Triple Decker rail train transporting GM cars.

61 World’s Largest Enclosed Luxury 9 Car Hauler. Equipment Specs: Truck – 2020 4900SF Western Star Trailer.

62 The 2020 Cottrell Wiggle Wagon. Reliable Carriers 9-Car Enclosed auto transporter.

63 Used for high volume, high value distribution for luxury auto brands such as Porsches, Mercedes, Maseratis and other luxury vehicles.

64 Professional auto transporter Marty Maxwell from Reliable Carriers gives us a tour of his beautiful Wiggle Wagon. See Video below.


Video and audio clips

Vintage Car Carriers


How do you load a Car Transporter?


How do you unload a Car Transporter?


Largest Enclosed Luxury 9 Car Hauler


Car Hauler Pride



Related

More Cars of the 1950s
More Ford Coverage

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Comments

Mario on Mar 22, 2024 said:

Car hauling went through some very evolutionary steps and took some time for it to establish its modern current role.

This is my Tribute to the creation of the Car Transport Carriers from the beginning to modern times. Enjoy! Mario

[Reply to this comment]

Anonymous on Mar 22, 2024 said:

Well this isn't a thread, it's an instructional walk thru a rare look at the auto transport industry. I have to mention pics 39, 40 as that is amazing to see the cars STILL on the carrier. There has to be a story there I'd like to hear. Somewhere there are some customers going: Wonder where my new car is?

This is also good to show how the regulations have changed, governmental as well as state. Having driven truck for many years, the regulations by state caused a lot of inconvenience.

I drove a 53 ft trailer from PA to Wash DC. 53 ft trailers were forbidden in Maryland AT THAT TIME. So we had to divert out of MD and then back over to come up to Wash DC. Stupid is not enough of a word.

We were then told to go through MD and they would pay the fines and tickets for the violation. It was cheaper than the reroute.

So the life of a truck driver is not as glamorous as it looks. Neither are the drivers. :-)

Great thread Mario......it almost makes me want to join Willie Nelson singing: "On the road again!".

I did say almost........didn't I?????????

Rob

[Reply to this comment]

Mario on Mar 23, 2024 said:

Check out this link Rob on the 56 Chevys for more info:

https://bringatrailer.com/2016/03/11/mystery-car-hauler-1950-coe-four-56-chevys/

Thank you again for your interesting insights on your trucking experience. Always welcomed.

Cheers, Mario

[Reply to this comment]

57timemachine on Mar 22, 2024 said:

Mario, you must stay up nights thinking up all this wonderful stuff. Another great topic here for all our gear headed minded folks. Mario, all your efforts are very much appreciated. Cheers to you sir.

[Reply to this comment]

Mario on Mar 22, 2024 said:

Thank you George. I hope you watched the video on the Wiggle Wagon an amazing Luxury Car Transport. We've come a long way in the last 100 years of Car Transport Carriers. Cheers, Mario

[Reply to this comment]

Mario on Mar 23, 2024 said:

Watch the videos on loading and unloading the cars to get an idea of the art and talent of the professional car haulers.

Each load is a work of art in figuring out where each car will go on the trailer. Then moving the ramps up and down to support your plan for each car.

Carefully loading and unloading all the cars with 100% accuracy and safety. No room for error!

[Reply to this comment]

57timemachine on Apr 1, 2024 said:

Mario, that rusty trailer with rusty 1956 Chevy's has one rusty 1957 Chevy. A 57 150 model to be exact. Who ever owns all those rusting relics has an interesting sense of humor. Cheers.

[Reply to this comment]

57timemachine on Apr 1, 2024 said:

Mario, it is not possible to watch any of your posted videos. At least from my end anyway. I have noticed this with your other postings as well. I wonder what could be wrong.

[Reply to this comment]

Mario on Apr 1, 2024 said:

I don't understand why you can't watch the videos George. 2 ways to watch either click on the arrow or go to watch on You Tube. They work for me both ways. Sorry you can't get the videos.

[Reply to this comment]

57timemachine on Apr 1, 2024 said:

Sorry Mario, I apologize for my error. They are all 1956 Chevy's and there is no lone 1957 Chevy. Being the old guy that I am, my eye sight is lack of sight sometime. Cheers.

[Reply to this comment]

Mario on Apr 1, 2024 said:

Not a problem George. Without my eye glasses my sight is not too good either.

[Reply to this comment]


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